Can family decide to donate organs?

Conclusion: The donation process is experienced by all the family, regardless of who signs the consent form. … 9,434/97, which gives family members the responsibility for the decision about organ and tissue donation from their deceased relatives.

Can family members decide to donate your organs?

Deciding to donate your organs is an enormous gift. … If you are in an accident and are declared legally dead, a member of the organ procurement organization (OPO) must obtain consent from your family to donate your organs.

Can family override organ donation?

One donor can save up to 8 lives through organ donation and save and heal more than 75 lives through tissue donation. … Just like a will, this decision is legally binding and cannot be overridden by your family; which is why it’s so important to discuss donation with your loved ones.

Can you choose who to donate an organ to?

Yes. When you specify who is to receive your donated organ or organs you are participating in what’s called directed or designated donation. This can be done for both deceased donors and living donors. If your organ is not compatible with the designated recipient, a paired exchange could be possible.

Can your organs be donated without consent?

The United States’ system for organ procurement operates under a model of expressed consent. This means that an individual will not be an organ donor unless he or she explicitly states otherwise.

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What are the disadvantages of organ donation?

Here Are the Cons of Organ Donation

  • It can prolong the grieving period of a family. …
  • There is not always a choice for the donation. …
  • Not everyone can become an organ donor. …
  • Organ donations can lead to other health problems. …
  • Not every organ which is donated will be accepted.

Why should you not donate organs?

The most common reasons cited for not wanting to donate organs were mistrust (of doctors, hospitals, and the organ allocation system), a belief in a black market for organs in the United States, and deservingness issues (that one’s organs would go to someone who brought on his or her own illness, or who could be a “bad …